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behemothing

Nov 1 '12
Oct 28 '12
calumet412:

US Steel South Works, 1910, Chicago.

calumet412:

US Steel South Works, 1910, Chicago.

(via calumet412)
Oct 28 '12
calumet412:

860 Lake Shore Drive, 1957, Chicago. Frank Scherschel.
This photo of Mies van der Rohe’s architectural innovation is one of my absolute favorites. It’s a Chicago version of Rear Window…

calumet412:

860 Lake Shore Drive, 1957, Chicago. Frank Scherschel.

This photo of Mies van der Rohe’s architectural innovation is one of my absolute favorites. It’s a Chicago version of Rear Window

(via calumet412)
Oct 21 '12
calumet412:

Cross section view of the substructure below the Marshall Field store on State Street, 1900, Chicago.
Important notes are the Caisson wells, which are the standard for most large scale architecture in Chicago and the “subway” (referenced in several past posts), a series of tunnels beneath the Loop formerly used for transportation of cargo, mail, etc…The tunnels were Chicago’s answer to New York’s subway system, meant to alleviate commercial traffic on surface streets.

calumet412:

Cross section view of the substructure below the Marshall Field store on State Street, 1900, Chicago.

Important notes are the Caisson wells, which are the standard for most large scale architecture in Chicago and the “subway” (referenced in several past posts), a series of tunnels beneath the Loop formerly used for transportation of cargo, mail, etc…The tunnels were Chicago’s answer to New York’s subway system, meant to alleviate commercial traffic on surface streets.

(via calumet412)
Oct 6 '12
Oct 6 '12
oldpainting:

Ernest Bieler, Deux Filles on Flickr.
Click image for 750 x 633 size. Via Art Inconnu

oldpainting:

Ernest Bieler, Deux Filles on Flickr.

Click image for 750 x 633 size.

Via Art Inconnu

(via oldpainting)
Sep 14 '12
Aug 14 '12
Twilight. A Castle by Isaac Levitan, 1898.
Twilight. A Castle by Isaac Levitan, 1898.

(Source: purplu)

Aug 14 '12
peira:

alongtimealone:
John Sloan:  Pigeons (1919) by *Huismus

peira:

alongtimealone:

John Sloan:  Pigeons (1919) by *Huismus

Jul 13 '12
scientificillustration:

aureliomadrid:

mythologyofblue:

Worldwide Distribution of Organic Nature, hand-colored lithography by Joseph Päringer based on original work by Ferdinand August von Ritgen & Johann Bernhard Wilbrand Gieson: C.G. Müller, 1821 (image from New York Botanical Garden’s Darwin Library Show, citation from *gossamer on Flickr)
(thank you, villagedog)

scientificillustration:

aureliomadrid:

mythologyofblue:

Worldwide Distribution of Organic Nature, hand-colored lithography by Joseph Päringer based on original work by Ferdinand August von Ritgen & Johann Bernhard Wilbrand Gieson: C.G. Müller, 1821 (image from New York Botanical Garden’s Darwin Library Show, citation from *gossamer on Flickr)

(thank you, villagedog)

Jul 13 '12
frenchhistory:


La maison tropicale - Jean Prouvé
@credits

Between 1949 and 1951, Jean Prouvé was commissioned to produce three prototype prefabricated tropical houses to address the shortage of housing and civic buildings in the French colonies of West Africa. Les Maisons Tropicales can be seen as the most elegant expression of Prouvé’s love of mobility. The ability to construct and dismantle was fundamental to Prouvé’s work and is evident in his designs for chairs, tables, tents and buildings.  Les Maisons Tropicales are the culmination of twenty years of experimentation by Prouvé into the prefabrication and industrial production of buildings. Two were erected in Brazzaville, in the Republic of Congo, in 1951. Built side by side and connected by a bridge, the smaller Brazzaville house was an information office for the company Aluminium Francais while the larger 18 x 10m house, was the home of the company’s commercial director, Jacques Piget. It is this larger Maison Tropicale that is being exhibited for the first time outside the Tate Modern in London.
Set on concrete stills because of the sloping site, La Maison Tropicale consisted of a folded, sheet steel portal frame with fixed and sliding aluminium wall panels. In response to the hot climate an adjustable aluminium sunscreen surrounded the veranda and acted as an outer reflective skin. Blue glass portholes protected against UV rays and the double roof structure provided natural ventilation. The design of the component parts was crucial. Flat, they could be tightly packed into a cargo plane for ease of transport. Light, they could be carried by just two men for ease of construction and not wider than 4m, the width of the rolling machine at Prouvé’s factory, for economy of manufacture.

frenchhistory:

La maison tropicale - Jean Prouvé

@credits

Between 1949 and 1951, Jean Prouvé was commissioned to produce three prototype prefabricated tropical houses to address the shortage of housing and civic buildings in the French colonies of West Africa. Les Maisons Tropicales can be seen as the most elegant expression of Prouvé’s love of mobility. The ability to construct and dismantle was fundamental to Prouvé’s work and is evident in his designs for chairs, tables, tents and buildings.  Les Maisons Tropicales are the culmination of twenty years of experimentation by Prouvé into the prefabrication and industrial production of buildings. Two were erected in Brazzaville, in the Republic of Congo, in 1951. Built side by side and connected by a bridge, the smaller Brazzaville house was an information office for the company Aluminium Francais while the larger 18 x 10m house, was the home of the company’s commercial director, Jacques Piget. It is this larger Maison Tropicale that is being exhibited for the first time outside the Tate Modern in London.


Set on concrete stills because of the sloping site, La Maison Tropicale consisted of a folded, sheet steel portal frame with fixed and sliding aluminium wall panels. In response to the hot climate an adjustable aluminium sunscreen surrounded the veranda and acted as an outer reflective skin. Blue glass portholes protected against UV rays and the double roof structure provided natural ventilation. The design of the component parts was crucial. Flat, they could be tightly packed into a cargo plane for ease of transport. Light, they could be carried by just two men for ease of construction and not wider than 4m, the width of the rolling machine at Prouvé’s factory, for economy of manufacture.

Jul 8 '12

All 135 NASA space launches in one video.

Grand Finale 2010-11 (by McLean Fahnestock via Open Culture)

Jul 3 '12
birdsong217:

Vilhelm Hammershoi (1864-1916) - Courtyard Interior at Strandgade 30, 1905

birdsong217:

Vilhelm Hammershoi (1864-1916) - Courtyard Interior at Strandgade 30, 1905

Jul 3 '12
muirgilsdream:

Two fishes, one insect.

muirgilsdream:

Two fishes, one insect.

Jul 2 '12
frenchhistory:

Signature du Traité de paix par la délégation allemande le 28 juin 1919 dans la Galerie des Glaces. William ORPEN
@credits

The Treaty of Versailles  was one of the peace treaties at the end of World War I. It ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers. It was signed on 28 June 1919, exactly five years after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. The other Central Powers on the German side of World War I were dealt with in separate treaties. Although the armistice signed on 11 November 1918, ended the actual fighting, it took six months of negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference to conclude the peace treaty. The treaty was registered by the Secretariat of the League of Nations on 21 October 1919, and was printed in The League of Nations Treaty Series.

frenchhistory:

Signature du Traité de paix par la délégation allemande le 28 juin 1919 dans la Galerie des Glaces.
William ORPEN

@credits

The Treaty of Versailles  was one of the peace treaties at the end of World War I. It ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers. It was signed on 28 June 1919, exactly five years after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. The other Central Powers on the German side of World War I were dealt with in separate treaties. Although the armistice signed on 11 November 1918, ended the actual fighting, it took six months of negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference to conclude the peace treaty. The treaty was registered by the Secretariat of the League of Nations on 21 October 1919, and was printed in The League of Nations Treaty Series.